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2016 Water Quality Summary


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2016 Water Quality Summary


Water Quality

The West Valley Water District provides our customers with safe, high quality and reliable water service at a reasonable rate and in a sustainable manner.

Water Quality

The West Valley Water District provides our customers with safe, high quality and reliable water service at a reasonable rate and in a sustainable manner.

The goal of our Annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) is to inform our customers about the quality of our drinking water, the sources of our water, any monitored contaminants found in drinking water, and whether our system meets state and federal drinking water standards.  Our water quality data is submitted to the State Water Resources Control Board, Division of Drinking Water (DDW), in order to monitor our compliance for all regulatory standards and assure high quality drinking water is consistently delivered directly to our customers.  

Although it can also be found naturally in water, WVWD monitors and treats for perchlorate. It is a remnant of past manufacturing and agricultural operations in our area. The District monitors for perchlorate within the treatment system and as the water exits the treatment facility.  Perchlorate is currently removed by three Ion Exchange Plants to treat Wells 16, 17, 18A, and 42, which are sampled weekly. Our new, state-of-the-art Groundwater Wellhead Treatment system also removes perchlorate from District Well No. 11 and Rialto Well No. 6, which analyzes perchlorate levels every thirty minutes using an Ion Chromatography instrument.

Contaminants are measured in micrograms per liter (μg/L) or milligrams per liter (mg/L). One microgram per liter, (μg/L) is equivalent to one part per billion.  To help put these numbers in context, one part per billion is like 1 second in 31.7 years, 1 teaspoon in 1.3 million gallons, and 1 drop in 13,563 gallons.  One milligram per liter (mg/L), is equivalent to one part per million. One part per million is like 1 second in 11.6 days, 1 teaspoon in 1,302 gallons, or 1 drop in 13.6 gallons.

In addition to maintaining high standards for our existing water supplies, we are also looking at innovative ways to bring new sources forward to help boost our supplies during the drought and for our future. Besides our new Groundwater Wellhead Treatment System which made previously inactive wells usable again, the District is currently moving forward with another project to remove perchlorate, nitrate, and trichloroethylene to further enhance production of those wells (WVWD Well No. 11 and Rialto Well No. 6). This water will also be treated and subject to rigorous testing, as all other water supplies, before it enters the drinking water system. 

Because we value transparency, we hope that you find this report clear and easy to understand.  If you have any questions about this report, feel free to contact Robin Glenney, Water Quality Supervisor at (909) 875 1804, extension 371 or via email at rglenney@wvwd.org.

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2016 Testing Process


2016 Testing Process


 
 

Our drinking water is subject to a rigorous testing process that includes weekly, monthly, quarterly, semi-annual, annual and triennial monitoring to ensure compliance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and State Water Resources Control Board – Division of Drinking Water (DDW) regulations. 

Water is monitored at various stages of the process, including at the source, during treatment, and throughout our distribution system to ensure that we are delivering the highest quality of water to our customers.  Here at the West Valley Water District, we even sample beyond what is required by the U.S. EPA and DDW. In fact, we double the amount of bacteriological samples required by DDW since the District covers such a large area.

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2016 Introduction


2016 Introduction


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West Valley Water District (District) is a Special District governed by a five-member Board of Directors providing retail water to approximately 82,000 customers. The District serves drinking water to portions of Rialto, Colton, Fontana, Bloomington, and portions of the unincorporated area of San Bernardino County, and a portion of the city of Jurupa Valley in Riverside County. Our mission is to provide a reliable, safe drinking water supply to meet our customers’ present and future needs at a reasonable cost and to promote water-use efficiency and conservation.

Our source of water comes from groundwater wells that pump from the Lytle, Rialto, Bunkerhill and North Riverside aquifers. We also treat surface water from Lytle Creek in the San Bernardino Mountains, and California State Project Water - Lake Silverwood.  Your District routinely tests for contaminants from these sources in accordance with Federal and State Regulations.

The District vigilantly safeguards its water supplies. District staff collects samples on a weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual and triennial basis in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and State Water Resources Control Board – Division of Drinking Water (DDW) regulations. 

The District operates and maintains several treatment plants to ensure we deliver the best water to our consumers; the Oliver P. Roemer Water Filtration Facility treats surface water from Lytle Creek and State Project Water delivered through Lake Silverwood; the Arsenic removal treatment plant treats water from Well No. 2; several Ion Exchange Treatment Systems treat water to remove Perchlorate from Well Nos. 16, 17, 18A, and 42. Our newest treatment facility, the Groundwater Wellhead Treatment System, removes perchlorate from District Well No. 11 and Rialto Well No. 6.  This facility is the first in the nation to use bioremediation to remove perchlorate and distribute water directly to customers.

In addition, the District and Carollo Engineers are embarking on another perchlorate treatment removal project using Fixed Bed Biological Reactors (FXB) to remove perchlorate, nitrate, and trichloroethylene. Construction of the FXB system began in summer 2016 and the facility scheduled to go online in calendar year 2018.  

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2016 Water Quality Results


2016 Water Quality Results







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2016 Frequently Asked Questions


2016 Frequently Asked Questions


Who Do We Serve?

West Valley Water District serves approximately 82,000 customers in the communities of Bloomington, Colton, Fontana, Rialto, parts of unincorporated areas in San Bernardino, and a portion of Jurupa Valley in Riverside County.


Where Is Our Water From?

West Valley Water District is composed of three water sources: groundwater, surface water and imported water.

Groundwater (46%)

The majority of our water supply comes from groundwater.  Approximately 46% of the total water supply is from the District’s groundwater wells, located in five local groundwater basins:

  • Chino Basin
  • Bunkerhill Basin
  • Lytle Creek Basin
  • North Riverside Basin
  • Rialto-Colton Basin

Surface Water (13%)

The District receives approximately 13% of our total water supply from Lytle Creek in the San Bernardino Mountains, and is treated through our Oliver P. Roemer Water Filtration Facility. The water goes through several treatment processes and disinfection prior to delivery. 

Imported (41%)

Groundwater

The District purchases water from the Baseline Feeder Project through San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District. This water comes from water pumped to Rialto from wells in San Bernardino, which makes up approximately 24% of our total water supply.

Surface Water

The District also purchases approximately 17% of our total water supply from the State Water Project through San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District. Also treated through our Oliver P. Roemer Water Filtration Facility.


How Often Is Our Water Tested?

Our water quality staff collects samples on a weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual and triennial basis using EPA and State Water Resources Control Board – Division of Drinking Water (DDW) regulations. We test for over 80 contaminants to ensure strict standards of water quality. 


How Safe Is Our Water?

West Valley Water District vigilantly safeguards its water supplies. Our water meets all Federal and State Regulations. We are proud that the District always meets, and exceeds, these standards.


What Is The District Doing To Protect Our Water?

We are committed to improving water quality through innovative technologies. The District operates and maintains several treatment plants to ensure we deliver clean and safe water to our consumers: 

  • The Groundwater Wellhead Treatment System, a new, first-in-the-nation project, using ground-breaking, cost-effective technology called bioremediation, was approved to remove perchlorate from drinking water supplies.  The Groundwater Wellhead Treatment System utilizes Fluidized Bed Biological Reactors (FBRs) to remove perchlorate and nitrate from District Well No. 11 and Rialto Well No. 6. This treatment facility using FBR technology began delivering clean water to our customers in September 2016. The next treatment system that is currently under construction uses Fixed Bed Reactors (FXBs) for perchlorate, nitrate, and trichloroethylene removal.  The FXB technology began construction in summer 2016 and will start delivering clean water to our customers in 2018.
  • The Oliver P. Roemer Water Filtration Facility treats surface water from Lytle Creek and State Project Water delivered through Lake Silverwood. 
  • The Arsenic removal treatment plant treats water from Well No. 2.
  • Several Ion Exchange Treatment Systems remove perchlorate from Well Nos. 16, 17, 18A, and 42.

What Contaminants Are Being Tested? 

West Valley Water District tests according to Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations, Safe Drinking Water Act. Click here to read Title 22

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock  operations, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, that can be naturally-occurring or result/ram urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides that may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals that are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems. 
  • Radioactive contaminants that can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the US. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. State Board regulations also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that provide the same protection for public health. 


Who is most vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. USEPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).


Where can I get more information about water contaminants?

To view completed source water assessments, you may visit our District office located at: 855 W Base Line, Rialto, California, 92376 or call (909) 875-1804.  You may also call the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline to discuss local drinking water quality, drinking water standards, contaminants, and potential health effects at 1-800-426-4791.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

www.waterboards.ca.gov

www.epa.gov

 
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2016 Definitions & Background


2016 Definitions & Background


IMPORTANT DEFINITIONS & BACKGROUND INFORMATION

To protect public health, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the State Water Resource Control Board (DDW) will commonly use the following definitions to standardize water quality information.

  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs (or MCLGs) as is economically and technologically feasible. Secondary MCL’s are set to protect the odor, taste and appearance of drinking water.
     
  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): This level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs are set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
     
  • Public Health Goal or PHG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below, which there is no known or expected risk to health. PHG’s are set by the California Environmental Protection Agency.
     
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
     
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
     
  • Primary Drinking Water Standard or PDWS: MCLs and MRDLs for contaminants that affect health along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment requirements.
     
  • Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
     
  • Picocuries per Liter (pCi/L): Measurement commonly used to measure radionuclides in water.
     
  • Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU): A measure of clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
     
  • Milligrams per Liter (mg/L): Or part per million (ppm) corresponds to one minute in two years.
  • Micrograms per Liter (ug/L): Or parts per billion (ppb) corresponds to one minute in 2000 years.
     
  • State Regulatory Action Level (AL): Concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
  • N/A: not applicable
     
  • ND: not detected
     
  • NL: notification level
     
  • DLR: Detection Level for Purposes of Reporting
     
  • Drinking Water Source Assessment and Protection (DWSAP):  Source assessment program for all District water sources.
     
  • IDSE: Initial Distribution System Evaluation
     
  • Running Annual Average (RAA): The yearly average which is calculated every 3 months using the previous 12 months’ data. 
     
  • Local Running Annual Average (LRAA): The RAA at one sample location. 
     
  • Disinfection By-Product: Compounds which are formed from mixing of organic or mineral precursors in the water with ozone, chlorine, or chloramine. Total Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic Acids are disinfection by-products. 
     
  • Secondary Drinking Water Standard (Secondary Standard): MCLs for contaminants that do not affect health but are used to monitor the aesthetics of the water. 
     
  • Notification Level (NL): Health-based advisory levels established by the State Board for chemicals in drinking water that lack MCLs.
     
  • 90th Percentile: The value in a data set in which 90 percent of the set is less than or equal to this value. The Lead and Copper Rule uses the 90th percentile to comply with the Action Level.

CONTAMINANT HEALTH RISK INFORMATION
(Significance of Results)

The District has listed the following as a health risk informational guide only.  Health risk assessments are based upon exceeding a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).  The State Board allows us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old.  Nitrate is routinely sampled within District wells annually.  None of these routine nitrate samples exceeded the MCL.  Perchlorate was detected in five (5) groundwater source.  All of these sources have treatment systems installed for Perchlorate removal.  

Arsenic: While your drinking water meets the current EPA standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic.  The standard balances the current understanding of arsenic’s possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic, which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems. 

Nitrate: Nitrate (as nitrogen) in drinking water at levels above 10 mg/L is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age.  Such nitrate levels in drinking water can interfere with the capacity of the infant’s blood to carry oxygen, resulting in a serious illness; symptoms include shortness of breath and blueness of the skin.  Nitrate levels above 10 mg/L may also affect the ability of the blood to carry oxygen in other individuals, such as pregnant women and those with certain specific enzyme deficiencies.  If you are caring for an infant, or you are pregnant, you should ask advice from your health care provider.


VULNERABILITY OF DISTRICT
WATER SOURCES

In 2002, the District, in partnership with the San Bernardino Valley Water Conservation District, conducted Source Water Assessments of all our drinking water wells. No contaminants have been detected above the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) set by State Water Resources Control Board; however sources are considered most vulnerable to the following:

Fecal Coliform and E. Coli Bacteria in our Source Water Supply. Heavy recreational activities in both Lytle Creek and Lake Silverwood during warm summer months increase the vulnerability.

Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) sources located near gasoline service stations and underground gas storage tanks are vulnerable. A MTBE plume is leaching from the Colton Gasoline Storage Terminal. Two (2) District Wells are located south of the Terminal. Well Nos. 40 and 41 are sampled monthly. No MTBE has ever been detected in these wells or any other District Well.

VOC & SOC Chemicals  tested in all District groundwater wells were determined to be vulnerable to both Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOC’s) and Synthetic Organic Chemicals (SOC’s).

Perchlorate has been detected at low levels in six (6) groundwater wells (Nos. 11, 16, 17, 18A, 41, 42).  Five of these wells are primary water sources and have treatment systems installed. It is believed that the likely sources for Perchlorate originate from former manufactures of rocket fuel/fireworks and fertilizer. (Well Nos. 11, 16, 17, 18A & 42 now have Ion Exchange Systems installed for Perchlorate removal). 

Nitrate in some groundwater wells are vulnerable. Nitrate contamination is the result of leaching septic systems and past citrus farming.

Cryptosporidium is a microbial pathogen found in surface water throughout the U.S. Although filtration removes Cryptosporidium, the most commonly-used filtration methods cannot guarantee 100 percent removal. Our monitoring indicates the presence of these organisms in our source water and/or finished water. Current test methods do not allow us to determine if the organisms are dead or if they are capable of causing disease. Ingestion of Cryptosporidium may cause Cryptosporidiosis, an abdominal infection.  Symptoms of infection include nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. Most healthy individuals can overcome the disease within a few weeks. However, immune-compromised people are at greater risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. We encourage immune-compromised individuals to consult their doctor regarding appropriate precautions to avoid infection. Cryptosporidium must be ingested to cause disease, and it may be spread through means other than drinking water.

Completed Source Water Assessments may be viewed at the District Office located at: 855 West Base Line, Rialto, California 92376. 


EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION TO LEARN
MORE ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER

Drinking water, including bottled, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as people with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, people who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. USEPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and in some cases, radioactive material and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
     
  • Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, that can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic waste water discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
     
  • Pesticides and herbicides, that may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and resident uses.
     
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals that are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum productions, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff and septic systems.
     
  • Radioactive contaminants that can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas productions and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, US EPA and the State Water Resources Control Board (DDW) prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The State Water Resources Control Board (DDW) also establishes limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

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2016 Remediation Efforts


2016 Remediation Efforts


Remediation Efforts

The West Valley Water District is looking at innovative ways to bring new sources forward to help boost our supplies during the drought and for our future. We are currently moving forward with two different projects to remove perchlorate, nitrate and trichloroethylene from existing, inactive wells to make them viable again using bioremediation — a natural process using microorganisms that already exist in water to consume the contaminants. 

Our newest treatment facility, The Groundwater Wellhead Treatment System, utilizes Fluidized Bed Biological Reactors (FBR) to remove perchlorate from District Well No. 11 and Rialto Well No. 6. This facility is the first in the nation to use bioremediation to remove perchlorate and distribute water directly to customers.

 

The next treatment system that is currently under construction uses Fixed Bed Reactors (FXBs) for perchlorate, nitrate, and trichloroethylene removal.  The FXB technology began construction in summer 2016 and will start delivering clean water to our customers in 2018.

This water will also be treated and subject to rigorous testing, as are all other water supplies, before it enters the drinking water system.

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2016 Drought & Conservation


2016 Drought & Conservation


Conservation: A Way of Life

California received record rainfall this past winter, but it’s critical for West Valley Water District (WVWD) customers to keep embracing conservation as a way of life and focus on using water efficiently. Despite a wet winter that helped to boost water supplies, particularly in Northern California, our water supply comes from groundwater basins which take longer to recover.

In the April 7th declaration ending the State’s three-year water emergency, Governor Brown stated, “the drought emergency is over, but the next drought could be around the corner.”  The State is also keeping in place many prohibitions against wasteful practices including no watering hardscapes like sidewalks and driveways, no watering within 48 hours of measureable rainfall, and making sure Californians fix water leaks quickly. While WVWD has certified to the State that we have sufficient supplies to meet demand and planned growth for the next three to five years, WVWD is still in a Stage II - Water Alert to help our groundwater supplies recover and to help us continue to meet future water demands. 

If you haven’t already made changes, WVWD offers many resources that promote water-use efficiency. For example, qualified homeowners can take advantage of the WECAN Turf Replacement Program funded by the Water-Energy Grant Program for the Water-Energy Community Action Network (WECAN) and WVWD. This program fully funds turf removal and drought tolerant landscape replacement projects between 750 and 1000 square feet at no cost to our customers. Income and geographic location requirements may apply, to find out if you qualify, please call (888) 899-8723 or send an email to WECAN@sawpa.org.

For more information about how you can make conservation a way of life and more details on all WVWD rebate programs, please visit us online at WVWD.org/conservation.

Activities

Our District staff regularly participates in community events to help promote conservation and educate customers about ways to save water. 

In addition, the District hosts free classes to help our customers learn more about water efficient landscaping.

We also work with local elementary schools to create an annual calendar featuring student artwork with a water conservation theme. The 2018 calendar winners were announced and student and teacher prizes were distributed in June 2017. 

Schedule of Events for 2016-17 

January - June 2017

  • The State of Women
  • Free Landscape Class: Water-Wise Landscape Design
  • Free Landscape Class: Landscape Irrigation
  • Joe Baca Middle School 21st Century Learning Gardens Unveiling Celebration
  • 3nd Annual Rialto Community Conservation Fair
  • The 2017 Incentives Fair
  • Inland Solar Challenge
  • Conservation Calendar Poster Contest 

July – December 2016

  • Rialto National Night Out
  • Fontana National Night Out
  • Free Landscape Class: Autumn = Landscape Heaven
  • Rialto Family Festival 
  • Free Landscape Class: Landscape Design for the Water-Wise
  • Bloomington Community Health & Resource Fair 

Available Rebate Programs

The West Valley Water District has a number of rebate programs to help customers save on their water bills. Below is a summary of the number of rebates awarded to date between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017.

To find out more about ways to save water and access rebate programs please click here.

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2016 Public Involvement


2016 Public Involvement


 

We need YOU!

Public involvement is central to ensuring that we are meeting the highest water supply, water quality, and customer service standards.  We welcome your input; please see below for ways you can be involved with West Valley Water District. Click on the links below.

Find us on the web

Participate in Conservation Events

Schedule a community or classroom presentation on water conservation

Attend Board and Committee Meetings

Sign up for Newsletters and Alerts

Let us know how we are doing

 
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Contact Us


Contact Us


 

Questions or comments? Give us a call.

Robin Glenney
 Water Quality Supervisor

909.875.1804 ext.371
rglenney@wvwd.org